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Thursday, September 20, 2018

2018 PILSTER GREAT PLAINS LECTURE

7:30pm (Mountain Time)     

Chadron State College Student Center

"A Dakota Writer on Stories Powerful Enough to Change the World"

2018 Pilster Lecturer, Susan Power (Standing Rock Sioux)

Introduction: Dr. Holly Boomer (Oglala Lakota), Oglala Lakota College

Welcome:  Dr. Charles Snare, Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Chadron State College

Welcome: Lynn Roper, President, Mari Sandoz Heritage Society

The lecture is FREE!  The lecture will be followed by audience questions, refreshments and book signings. Books will be available for purchase at the lecture.

 

Friday, September 21, 2018

8:30 am (Mountain Time) 

Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center Chicoine Atrium

SYMPOSIUM REGISTRATION & PACKET PICK UP

 

8:50am

WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS

 

9:00am

SESSION 1

"Dr. Susan La Flesche – A Warrior to Her People"

Twenty-four years after her birth in a buffalo-hide tipi in western Nebraska, Susan La Flesche graduated as the valedictorian of her medical school class and became America’s first Native doctor – 31 years before women could vote and 35 years before Natives became citizens in their own country. This is the story of how La Flesche overcame enormous gender and racial barriers to effectively become the chief of her beloved Omaha Indian people.

Speaker: Joe Starita, Professor, College of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Introduction: Torri Brumbaugh, editor of the Chadron State Eagle campus newspaper

Moderator: Michael Kennedy, CSC Journalism instructor and Eagle advisor

 

10:00am

SESSION 2

"Landscape, Place, and Identity: Two Visual Artists Respond to the Plains"

CSC Visual Art Professors Laura Bentz and Mary Donahue will share, through their art, how they respond to the landscape they call home.

Speakers: Mary Donahue & Laura Bentz, CSC Art Department

Introduction: Tristan Stephenson, CSC Art Education student

 

11:00am

SESSION 3

2018 Sandoz Scholar

"Mari Sandoz: Crafting a Nebraska Character, Fashioning an Exhibition" 

This paper shares insights and details of an innovative approach to inquiry and scholarly output: the student-led research and design of the museum exhibition, “Mari Sandoz: Crafting a Nebraska Character,” which ran from May 3rd to September 7th in UNL’s Department of Textiles, Merchandising & Fashion Design. The exhibition focused on Mari Sandoz’ signature style and the relationship between her fashion sense and the crafting of her public persona. Research for the exhibition was conducted by seven TMFD and Anthropology graduate students enrolled in the Spring 2018 course, “Museums: Theory and Practice” (taught by Dr. Claire Nicholas). Students explored primary and secondary sources relating to the biographical and professional arc of Sandoz’ life, her journey from impoverished, rural Nebraska to the vibrant Greenwich Village literary scene in wartime and post-WWII New York City, and her relationship to self-presentation and long-standing interest in fashion and style. Some of these sources include excerpts of Sandoz’ letters to her family and friends, biographical studies and books, photographs of Sandoz, and material culture analysis of select clothing and accessories from the Mari Sandoz Heritage Society’s garment and accessories collection. The exhibition sought to explore how Sandoz’ careful curation of her public and professional identity (as evidenced in her correspondence, for example) carried over to the attention she gave to her appearance. The paper presents some of the findings from the students’ research on Sandoz’ style and discusses the process of developing the exhibition as it relates to material culture studies and methods more generally.

Speaker: Katie Francisco, Graduate Research Assistant, Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Instructor: Dr. Claire Nicholas, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Material Culture, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Introduction: Inaugural Sandoz Scholar & Member of the Sandoz Scholar Committee, Dr. Jillian Wenburg, Fort Lewis College

 

NOON-1:30pm    LUNCHEON     

Chadron State College Student Center

Presentation of the 2018 "In the Spirit of Mari Sandoz" Award, lively table networking and conversation

 

Return to the Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center Chicoine Atrium following the luncheon

 

1:30pm

SESSION 4

"Ally and Advocate: Mari's Approach to Support for Native Peoples"

This presentation explores the ways in which Mari Sandoz used her writing skills and authorial notoriety as a platform for addressing social justice and civil rights issues on behalf of Native American peoples. More specifically, the paper will focus on her activism for the Northern Cheyenne and Lakota tribes.

Speaker: Dr. Kimberli Lee (Hunka Lakota), Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK

Introduction: Shannon Smith, Executive Director, Wyoming Humanities Council

 

2:30pm

SESSION 5

"Warrior Women: Past & Present"

In the spirit of Mari Sandoz we will screen the newly released film Warrior Women and hear from the film team of Madonna Thunder Hawk and Dr. Elizabeth Castle. The film is story of Lakota mother and daughter activism from Wounded Knee through Standing Rock. The film was produced though a long term collaboration between Thunder Hawk and Castle who met when they first shared stories when Castle interviewed her for her doctoral dissertation almost 20 years ago. Since they have worked together to collectively tell the story of women's activism in the Red Power Movement. They will also discuss the contemporary activist legacy and what is happening now in the Plains and how Native women and white allies are leading the way.

Speakers: Dr. Beth Castle & Madonna Thunder Hawk (Oohenumpa Lakota)

Introduction: Adam Hughes, CSC Communications Professor

Saturday, September 22, 2018

SATURDAY MORNING AT THE BEAN BROKER

The Bean Broker, Downtown Chadron

202 W. 2nd Street

 

9:30am

SESSION 5

“Who Are the Real Savages?”: Uncovering the Complex Story of Western Nebraska’s Lakota Activism

The region where Mari Sandoz grew up and wrote about saw a multifaceted grassroots Lakota civil rights movement during the twentieth century. Scholars often center western Nebraska’s Lakota activism around the American Indian Movement (AIM) during the early 1970s. Federal, state, and local archives, however, reveal a more complex narrative that includes numerous Native American organizations and persons, both male and female, pushing for civil rights in western Nebraska.

Speaker: Dr. David Christensen

Introduction: Tom Smith, CSC History Professor

 

10:30am

CLOSING REMARKS & ANNOUNCEMENT OF 2019 PILSTER LECTURE & MARI SANDOZ SYMPOSIUM

"Populism"

September 19-21, 2019 (tentative)